September 25 | October 2 | October 9 | October 11 | October 16 | October 23 | October 30 | November 6 | November 19

Schedule

Readings for September 25, 1998

Doheny-Farina, Stephen. The Wired Neighborhood (Yale University Press, 1996). Chapter 8, "Virtual Schools," pp. 105-117 (ST)

Tapscott, Don. Growing Up Digital: The Rise of the Net Generation (McGraw-Hill, 1998). Chapter 7: "N-Gen Learning," pp. 125-157 (LAD)

Shenk, David. Data Smog: Surviving the Information Glut (HarperEdge, 1997). Chapter 4: "A New Generation of Geniuses: Dreaming the techno-utopian dream," pp. 59-76 (LAD)

Sanders, Barry. A is for ox: the collapse of literacy and the rise of violence in an electronic age (Vintage Books, 1994), Chapter 6, pp. 187-232 (ST)

Readings for October 2, 1998

"First Virtual High School Graduating Class: 1998,: Reality Check, Brad Wieners and David Pescovitz, San Francisco: Hardwired, 1996, 11. (ST)

The Harvard Conference on the Internet and Society (O’Reilly & Associates, 1997)

Celente, Gerald. Trends 2000: How to Prepare for and Profit from the Changes of the 21st Century (Warner Book, 1997), chapter 18, "Interactive U.," pp. 239-258 (ST)

Pavlik, John V. New Media Technology: Cultural and Commercial Perspectives, Second Edition (Needham Heights, MA: Allyn & Bacon, 1998). Chapter 10: Social and Cultural Consequences, pp. 284-340. (LAD)

Readings for October 9, 1998

Besser, Howard. Education as Marketplace, in Robert Muffoletto and Nancy Nelson Knupfer (eds), Computers in Education: Social, Political, and Historical Perspectives. Cresskill, New York: Hampton Press, 1993, 37-69. (ST)

Eisenberg, Rebecca. No watershed without mass access. San Francisco Examiner, Sunday, September 20, 1998, B1, B9.

Muffoletto, Robert. The Expert Teaching Machine: Unpacking the Mask, in Robert Muffoletto and Nancy Nelson Knupfer (eds), Computers in Education: Social, Political, and Historical Perspectives. Cresskill, New York: Hampton Press, 1993, 91-104.

Nelson Knupfer, Nancy. Teachers and Educational Computing: Changing Roles and Changing Pedagogy, in Robert Muffoletto and Nancy Nelson Knupfer (eds), Computers in Education: Social, Political, and Historical Perspectives. Cresskill, New York: Hampton Press, 1993, 163-180. (ST)

Popkewitz, Thomas S. and David S. Shutkin. Social science, Social Movements, and the Production of Educational Technology in the U.S., in Robert Muffoletto and Nancy Nelson Knupfer (eds), Computers in Education: Social, Political, and Historical Perspectives. Cresskill, New York: Hampton Press, 1993, 11-36.

First Science Fiction Film Viewing (Sunday, October 11, 1998)

View Metropolis (Fritz Lang, 1926). See The Internet Movie Database for detailed information about the film: http://us.imdb.com/Title?Metropolis+(1926)

See also a selective bibliography of materials in the UC Berkeley Library: http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/metropolis.html

And here’s Roger Ebert’s review of Metropolis:

http://www.suntimes.com/ebert/old_movies/metropolis.html

Readings for October 16, 1998

Principal Readings:

Postman, Neil. Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business. New York: Penguin Books, 1985. Chapter 10, "Teaching as an Amusing Activity," 142-154. (ST)

Roszak, Theodore. The Cult of Information: The Folklore of Computers and the True Art of Thinking. New York: Pantheon Books, 1986. Chapter 3, "The Hidden Curriculum," 47-71. (LAD)

Optional Readings:

Postman, Neil. Conscientious Objections: Stirring Up Trouble About Language, Technology, and Education. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1988. Chapter 9, "The Word Weavers/The World Makers," 172-197. (LAD)

Dertouzos, Michael L. What Will Be: How the New World of Information Will Change Our Lives. SanFrancisco: HarperEdge, 1997. Chapter 8, "Learning," 175-190. (ST)

Readings for October 23, 1998

(Class discussion of group study)

Critical Consequences of Technology: Virtual Education and related issues.

Principal Readings:

Chomsky, Noam. Propaganda and Control of the Public Mind, in Robert W. McChesney, Ellen Meiksins Wood, and John Bellamy Foster, Capitalism and the Information Age: The Political Economy of the Global Communication Revolution. New York: Monthly Review Press, 1998, 179-189.

Noble, David F. The Digital Diploma Mills: The Automation of Higher Education, First Monday: Peer Reviewed Journal on the Internet, 1998, available at http://firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_1/noble/index.html

Optional Readings:

DeLong, Stephen E. The Shroud of Lecturing, First Monday, 1997, available at http://firstmonday.dk/issues/issue2_5/delong/

Lakoff, George, interviewed by Iain A. Boal. Body, Brain, and Communication, in James Brook and Iain A. Boal, Resisting the Virtual Life: The Culture and Politics of Information. San Francisco: City Lights Books, 1995, 115-130.

Margolis, Michael. Brave New Universities. First Monday: Peer Reviewed Journal on the Internet, 1998. Available at: http://firstmonday.dk/issues/issue3_5/margolis/index.html

Readings for October 30, 1998

Growing Up Digital: The Future of Children and Learning

Principal Readings:

Johnson-Eilola, Johndan. Living on the surface: learning in the age of global communication networks, in Ilana Snyder, Page to Screen: Taking Literacy into the Electronic Era. New York: Routledge, 1998, 185-210.

Smith, Richard and Pamela Curtin. Children, computers and life online: education in a cyber-world, in Ilana Snyder, Page to Screen: Taking Literacy into the Electronic Era. New York: Routledge, 1998, 211-233.

Optional Readings:

Rosenzweig, Roy and Steve Brier. Historians and Hypertext: Is It More Than Hype? In Lawrence Dowler, editor, Gateways to Knowledge: The Role of Academic Libraries in Teaching, Learning, and Research. Cambridge: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1997, 181-196.

Tabbi, Joseph. Reading, Writing, Hyptertext: Democratic Politics in the Virtual Classroom, in David Porter, editor. Internet Culture. New York: Routledge, 1996, 233-252.

See also other readings from category, covered in previous weeks. (Tapscott, etc.)

Second Science Fiction Film Viewing (Friday, November 6, 1998)

View Johnny Mnemonic (Robert Longo, 1995). Script by William Ford Gibson.

Summary of plot: The year is 2021, and half of the Earth's population is suffering from the disease known as Nerve Attenuation Syndrome (NAS). Johnny, a mnemonic data courier, is hired by the Pharmacom corporation to carry 320 gigabytes of crucial information--the cure of NAS, which Pharmacom does not wish to reveal to the public. Pursued by Yakuza agents and a crazed cyborg, Johnny must deliver the data or die in twenty-four hours from "information overload." The Low-tech group tries to break the missing code so it can save the world.

See The Internet Movie Database for detailed information about the film: http://us.imdb.com/M/title-exact?Johnny%20Mnemonic%20%281995%29

Readings for November 6

Global Perspectives on Technology (Imperialism, and the Have and Have Nots)

Principal Readings:

Romano de Sant’Anna, Affonso. Libraries, Social Inequality, and the Challenge of the Twenty-First Century, in Stephen R. Graubard and Paul LeClerc, editors, Books, Bricks, and Bytes: Libraries in the Twenty-First Century. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers, 1998, 267-282.

Attali, Jacques, Izumi Aizu, Karanjga Gakio, Nathan Gardels, Douglas Rushkoff, Anne-Marie Slaughter, and Xiaoyong Wu (panelists) on May 31, 1996, panel moderated by Arthur R. Miller. Cultural Imperialism on the Net in The Harvard Conference on the Internet and Society. Sebastopol: O’Reilly & Associates, 1997, 466-482.

Wresch, William. Disconnected: Have and Have-Nots in the Information Age. New Brunswick, New Jersey: Rutgers University Press, 1996. Chapter 9: World Education, 175-196

Optional Readings:

Eisenberg, Rebecca. No watershed without mass access. San Francisco Examiner, Sunday, September 20, 1998, B1, B9.

Stratton, Jon. Cyberspace and the Globalization of Culture, in David Porter, editor. Internet Culture. New York: Routledge, 1996, 253-276.

Readings for November 19

The Future of Libraries and Museums

Principal Readings:

Besser, Howard. The Transformation of the Museum and the Way It’s Perceived, in Jones-Gamil, Katherine, editor. The Wired Museum: Emerging Technologies and Changing Paradigms. Washington, D.C.: American Association of Museums, 1997, 153-169

Mintz, Ann. Techno-Logic: In Our Computerized Society, The Museum—Three Dimensional…and Reality-Based—May Now Be More Important than Ever. Museum News, July-August 1992, 44-45.

Mintz, Ann. That’s Edutainmment! Museum News, Nov.-Dec. 1994, 33-35.

Wilkinson, James. Homesteading on the Electronic Frontier: Technology, Libraries, and Learning, in Lawrence Dowler, editor, Gateways to Knowledge: The Role of Academic Libraries in Teaching, Learning, and Research. Cambridge: Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 1997, 181-196.

Optional Readings:

Anderson, Maxwell L. "Perils and Pleasures of the Virtual Museum." Museum News, November-December 1994, 37-38, 64.

Dowlin, Kenneth E. and Eleanor Shapiro. The Centrality of Communities to the Future of Major Public Libraries, in Stephen R. Graubard and Paul LeClerc, editors, Books, Bricks, and Bytes: Libraries in the Twenty-First Century. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers, 1998, 173-190.

"The High Tech Museum," Museum News, July/August 1992, 36-43, 74-75.

Marcum, Deanna B. Redefining Community through the Public Library, in Stephen R. Graubard and Paul LeClerc, editors, Books, Bricks, and Bytes: Libraries in the Twenty-First Century. New Brunswick: Transaction Publishers, 1998, 191-206.

See also additional readings in "Technology, Libraries, and Learning" section, above.