Current Location

DEFINITION

Identification of the repository that currently houses the work of art, and its geographical location.

SUBCATEGORIES

REPOSITORY NAME
GEOGRAPHIC LOCATION
REPOSITORY NUMBERS
REMARKS
CITATIONS


Current Location - Repository Name

DEFINITION

The name of the repository that currently houses the work. If the work is lost, stolen, or destroyed, this subcategory identifies the last known repository and states that the work has been lost, stolen, or destroyed, or that its current repository is unknown.

EXAMPLES

Musée Historique du Château de Vitré
Graphische Sammlung Albertina
Chiesa di Santa Cecilia in Trastevere
Department of Prints and Drawings, Metropolitan Museum of Art
Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden
Tablet Collections, University Museum, University of Pennsylvania
location unknown; formerly Dan Fellows Platt Collection
destroyed in 1966; formerly Gabinetto Desegni e Stampe, Uffizi

DISCUSSION

This subcategory names the repository that currently has physical responsibility for the object. This excludes temporary loans, which should be recorded in EXHIBITION/LOAN HISTORY.

When an institution comprises divisions or departments each of which has responsibility for objects, it is important to note the administrative unit that has direct responsibility for the object, as well as the parent institution to which the administrative unit belongs. For example, the repository of a sarcophagus could be the Department of Egyptian Antiquities in the British Museum (London). There may be multiple administrative levels (e.g., Department of Italian Paintings, which is part of the Paintings Division, which is part of the National Gallery). With a smaller institution, there may be no administrative subdivisions. For example, the repository of a decorated chest may be simply the Gorey Castle Museum (Gorey, Jersey, Channel Islands).

ACCESS

REPOSITORY NAME is a PRIMARY ACCESS POINT. Repositories may have multiple names, and researchers may search by any variant name. When repositories are composed of multiple hierarchical levels, access should be possible at any level.

TERMINOLOGY/FORMAT

The use of an authority file of persons and corporate bodies is recommended; vocabulary resources include Canadiana Authorities and LC Name Authorities.


Current Location - Geographic Location

DEFINITION

The geographic place where the work of art is currently located. If the work is lost, stolen, or destroyed, this subcategory identifies its last known geographic location.

EXAMPLES

Vienna, Austria
Libreville, Gabon
New York, New York, United States
51 Shangxing Street, Jinan, Shangdong, China
Piazza dei Caprettari, Roma, Italia
location unknown, formerly at Aghia Triadha, Iraklion department, Crete, Greece

DISCUSSION

The geographic location is the physical location of the repository. The location should be recorded at least to the level of city or town. Street addresses may also be recorded. For large repositories that have facilities in diverse locations, it is useful to record the geographic location of the administrative unit that holds the object when this differs from the location of the main repository buildings. For example, the National Archives of the United States in Washington, DC, has administrative units that hold objects in Arlington, Virginia, and other locations.

It may be necessary to record location independently of repository when there is no repository associated with the object. For example, the obelisk in Piazza Caprettari in Rome is not located in a "repository." (The government entity that has jurisdiction over the obelisk should be recorded in OWNERSHIP/COLLECTING HISTORY.) Another example would be an artifact that is now lost, and was last known to exist at an archaeological site.

ACCESS

The geographic location of a work is a PRIMARY ACCESS POINT. Retrieval on all variant names associated with a place is important. Searching on place names must be done at varying levels of specificity, so hierarchical relationships between places must be accommodated.

This location may be stored in an authority record for the person/corporate body that is the repository. However, repository location should also appear with the REPOSITORY NAME in the record for the object; since many repositories may have the same name (e.g., National Gallery), it is necessary to include the repository location with the name to clearly identify the repository. It should also be possible to associate a geographic location with an object independently of a repository, to accommodate objects not housed in any repository.

TERMINOLOGY/FORMAT

The use of consistent geographic place names is recommended; vocabulary resources include BGN, Canadiana Authorities, TGN, LC Name Authorities, and LCSH.


Current Location - Repository Numbers

DEFINITION

Any unique identifiers assigned to a work by the current or last known repository.

EXAMPLES

1987.776.32 A
P&D 3455-90
83.AE.362; 84.AE.80; 85.AE.385 [Figure 16]
AR1982:0002, #145: 116
Barb. lat. 4434, folio 3
Ms. Coll. E.2.I.28
H1/503/1913

DISCUSSION

It is important to record any numeric or alphanumeric code (such as an accession number, shelf number, etc.) or phrase that uniquely identifies the object as belonging to a collection held by the repository or one of its administrative units. The identifier usually contains coded information used by the repository, such as the date of accession, donor, or physical location of the object within the repository. For objects that are part of volumes or groups, the identifier may be a concatenation of unique identifiers for the object at hand and its larger contexts (e.g., AR1982:0002, #145: 116 identifies object 116 within subgroup 145, which in turn is in the larger group AR1982:0002).

There may be multiple identifiers associated with a work: for example, when the identifier has changed over time (e.g., Ms. Ludwig IX 19 and 83.ML.115 [Figure 7]), or when a single object is composed of fragments acquired over time (e.g., 83.AE.362 and 84.AE.80 and 85.AE.385 [Figure 16]).

ACCESS

REPOSITORY NUMBERS are PRIMARY ACCESS POINTS. Multiple identifiers should be accommodated. Although the repository itself will probably have access needs related to information coded in the identifiers, the researcher generally needs only to know the identifier in order to uniquely identify the object and to locate the object within the repository.


Current Location - Remarks

DEFINITION

Any remarks relevant to the current location or repository where the work is housed.


Current Location - Citations

DEFINITION

Identification of the sources for the information on the current location of the work of art.